Signs & Symptoms of Anorexia

What are the signs and symptoms of anorexia nervosa?

At Life Works, our eating disorder experts recognise that anorexia nervosa can be a debilitating condition, and can be extremely difficult to cope with.

The symptoms and causes of anorexia are largely focused around unhealthy eating patterns and distorted body image. People suffering from anorexia will often restrict their calorie intake and obsess over the foods they do eat. This can lead to unhealthy weight loss, a dangerously low body mass index (BMI) and a whole host of long-term problems such as osteoporosis, malnutrition, electrolyte imbalance and even death. 

Anorexia can also be a very secretive disorder, with individuals going to extreme lengths to conceal their weight loss or eating habits. Not only does this have psychological consequences, but it can also mean that expert help and treatment may not be sought in a timely manner.

The signs and symptoms of anorexia can vary from person to person and can be categorised into psychological, physical and behavioural/social symptoms.

Psychological symptoms of anorexia:

  • Being terrified of putting on weight, and showing an unwillingness to gain weight
  • Having an obsession with the fat and calorie content of your food
  • Believing that you are fat, when other people say that you are thin. For example, thinking that certain parts of your body are too ‘fat’ even though you are underweight
  • Feeling as though you will never be thin enough
  • Being obsessed with looking a certain way and striving for a certain body shape
  • Not being able to stop thinking about food, and feeling as though this has taken over your life
  • Feeling guilty and ashamed when you eat
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Stress
  • Self-harm
  • Low self-esteem
  • Panic attacks
  • Suicidal thoughts
  • Finding that you get angry, irritable and impatient for no reason and taking this out on those who are closest to you
  • Mood swings
  • Finding that you are crying more than usual and become emotional for no apparent reason
  • Finding it difficult to concentrate due a lack of energy
  • Inability to make rational decisions
  • Exacerbation of any existing mental health problems such as anxiety, depression or obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD)

Physical symptoms of anorexia:

  • Significant weight loss over a short period of time
  • Exhaustion and extreme tiredness due to starvation
  • Disrupted sleep patterns
  • Dizziness
  • Dry/yellowish skin
  • Feeling cold all the time
  • Heart palpitations and bradycardia (abnormally low heart rate)
  • Dehydration
  • Headaches
  • Bad breath, tooth decay and scars on the back of your hands as a result of induced vomiting
  • Low blood pressure
  • Constipation
  • Abdominal pain
  • Loss of sexual urges - this could be due to a lack of body confidence

Behavioural/social symptoms of anorexia:

  • Drastically limiting the amount that you eat and drink
  • Obsessively counting calories, checking food labels and weighing out food portions
  • Having a list of foods that you won’t allow yourself to eat
  • Weighing yourself over and over again
  • Exercising excessively in an attempt to burn off calories
  • Making yourself sick after eating
  • Taking laxatives or diuretics (medication that removes fluid from the body)
  • Visiting pro-anorexia (pro-‘ana’) websites or social media platforms
  • Carrying out certain rituals when you eat such as only using certain plates/cutlery, separating food groups on your plate, chewing a certain number of times, chewing food and then spitting it out, or cutting your food into tiny pieces
  • Denying that you have a problem, both to yourself and others
  • Throwing food away and telling people that you have eaten it
  • Making excuses/lying for not eating such as “I’m not hungry”, “I don’t feel very well”, or “I’ve already eaten”
  • Telling people that you are vegetarian or wheat/lactose intolerant so that you can avoid eating more food groups and calories
  • Underestimating the impact of your low body weight on your health
  • Telling people that they are being too dramatic about your eating habits
  • Blaming your unhealthy eating habits on other people or situations in your life, such as “I don’t have time to eat at work because I’m so busy”
  • Wearing baggy clothes to conceal your thinning frame
  • Not wanting to meet with family and friends in order to avoid eating, or answering questions about your eating habits, resulting in social isolation
  • Reduced performance at work

What are the long-term effects of anorexia nervosa?

Without timely, professional treatment, anorexia can result in a number of devastating long-term health problems, including:

  • Problems with bones, hair and teeth due to a lack of calcium and other vital nutrients within your diet. This could also lead to enduring physical health conditions such as osteoporosis
  • Heart and kidney problems - this is due to a lack of vital nutrients and low calorie intake, which puts pressure on the heart
  • Seizures
  • Loss/interruption of periods in women
  • Infertility in women
  • Organ failure and subsequent death

If you are ready to start your journey to anorexia recovery, please call Life Works at 0800 081 0700 or fill out our contact form.

 

This page was reviewed by Steve Clarke (FdSc, MSc, NCFED) in March 2019, and is scheduled to be reviewed again in March 2021.

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